Monthly Archives: September 2020

More festive classical gabbing

The podcast continues apace. Games! Stories! Music! It’s great.

Episode 4 includes:

  • A rousing round of Listening Limbo
  • The dissolution of the Columbia University Marching Band
  • Norman Lebrecht’s zero-star review of “John Williams in Vienna”
  • An interview with Garrett McQueen about the current state of classical radio.

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Watch “The Bowmakers” EXTENDED thru 9/22

UPDATE: “The Bowmakers” is not playing through Tuesday, September 22 at midnight.

The Bowmakers” is a documentary about a most surprising subject: five of the world’s greatest creators of violin, viola, and cello bows all happen to live in the same small coastal town in rural Washington state. Check out the trailer:

My group, OSSCS, is sponsoring the digital premiere of this film; it’s never been seen outside of Port Townsend, WA (with the exception of a couple festivals.)

Tickets are $15, which might seem steep, but just consider that half of that is actually a donation to OSSCS, and now is certainly a great time to send your support. But also consider that, like, this is just a fantastic piece of cinema, and I promise that you will both enjoy and learn a ton of stuff watching it!

The Classical Gabfest

Like seemingly everyone else on the planet, I’ve started a podcast. Well, not just me — it’s me and my friends Kensho and Tiffany, two of the most intelligent and well-informed people I know.

I stole the format from Slate (I worship Slate podcasts and basically remain on Twitter only to interact with their hosts and producers.) It’s a weekly discussion show where we pick three topics having to do with classical music. It could be something about music and politics or culture, or a new album release, or an internet kerfuffle, or a bit of news related to the discipline or industry.

Crucially, we’re trying to make this show a broad-based look at the world of classical music. When classical music breaks through to the mainstream media, it’s usually just something to do with the world of the biggest orchestral institutions, or star conductors — very often it’s strikes or budget cuts or bad behavior.

But the way I see it, most of what happens in the world of classical music happens at a much more grassroots level. It happens in schools and houses of worship and (now more than ever) in people’s living quarters and online.

Oh, and I should mention: there’s also games (!) and listening recommendations in every episode. And we’re like, fun people. I promise!

The Classical Gabfest is now available wherever fine podcasts are downloaded (Apple, Spotify, YouTube, the world wide web, etc.) Enjoy!